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Burgundy Gate (Porte de Bourgogne)

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The Burgundy Gate is located next to the Quai Richelieu Quay, about a kilometer east of the Cathedral of St. Andrew the First-Called. These gates (more precisely, rather a triumphal arch) were part of the project of the mayor of Tourney to improve Bordeaux, which surrounded the city with a ring of parks and alleys and created several squares decorated with triumphal arches. The Burgundy Gate marked the entrance to the city from the side of the road leading to Paris, and their name is dedicated to Louis, the Duke of Burgundy, the brother of Kings Louis XVI, Louis XVIII and Charles X.

The Burgundy Gate was built from 1750 to 1755, construction was supervised by the architect Ange-Jacques Gabriel, who later created the Small Trianon in Versailles, the northern wing of the Louvre and Place de la Concorde, and had the rank of First Royal Architect. The gate is a classic triumphal arch with two columns of a Doric order. Initially, they had two more small side arches, but they were demolished in 1807.

The Burgundy Gate is declared a historical monument by decree of June 2, 1921.

Photo and description

The Burgundy Gate, built in the middle of the 18th century, was part of a large project for the improvement of Bordeaux, which was conceived and implemented by the mayor of the Marquis de Tourney. Their construction was carried out from 1750 to 1755, during the same period several parks, alleys and squares appeared in Bordeaux, also decorated with several gates, which were monumental arched structures. There are eight arched gates in total in Bordeaux. In the mid-18th century, for example, the Aquitaine Gate and the Dijo Gate were also built.

The Burgundy Gate in Bordeaux is also known under the names "Arc de Triomphe" and "Gate of the Solovars." They are located next to city landmarks such as Stone Bridge and Place Victor Hugo, as well as next to the Richelieu promenade and about a kilometer from the Cathedral of Saint-Andre.

The construction of the Burgundy Gate was led by the architect Ange-Jacques Gabriel, known as the author of the Market Square in Bordeaux, the Small Trianon in Versailles and the northern wing of the Louvre, who was the chief architect of the royal court. Initially, two arches of smaller size adjoined the gate from two sides, but they were demolished at the beginning of the 19th century. The gates were built in the form of a classical triumphal arch with two Doric columns on each side without any extra decorative frills.

The Burgundy Gate got its name in honor of Louis, the Duke of Burgundy and the brother of the three kings of France - Louis XVI and XVIII, as well as Charles X. The gate was built at the entrance to Bordeaux along the road leading from Paris. For some time, the gate was called the Arch of Napoleon - the renaming was timed to coincide with the visit of the emperor to Bordeaux in 1808, who, by the way, did not like the city itself or its inhabitants.

The Burgundy Gate in Bordeaux has the status of a historical monument of France since 1921.

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The gates are located opposite the Stone Bridge, not far from the house of Victor Hugo, as well as within walking distance from the Richelieu embankment. They were declared a historical monument on June 2, 1921.

The Burgundy Gate was built from 1750 to 1755, the process was led by the architect Ange-Jacques Gabriel, who later created the Small Trianon in Versailles, the northern wing of the Louvre and Place de la Concorde, and had the rank of First Royal Architect. The gate is a classic triumphal arch with two columns of a Doric order. Initially, they had two more small side arches, but were demolished in 1807.

Famous and ancient entrance to the city

The opinions of historians on the origin of the name of the architectural monument vary. Some argue that when he visited Napoleon did not like the inhabitants, nor the city, nor the wine. And of the wines, he loved Burgundian most of all. That is why the arch is supposedly so named. Others say that the gate is named after the Duke of Burgundy.

Earlier, the entrance to the city from the road leading to Paris was marked by the Burgundy Gate. Their construction was carried out for five years: from 1750 to 1755. And the first royal architect, Ange-Jacques Gabriel, who authored the Small Trianon in Versailles, the northern part of the wing of the Louvre, and the famous Place de la Concorde, created the project and supervised the construction.

The original form of the gate was in a classic form with a pair of columns of the Doric order and two small side arches. These additional arches were removed in 1807. And already in 1921 they were included in the register of historical monuments of the country by decree.

In the city of Bordeaux also remained ancient buildings that were not built up with new buildings - this is the Bordeaux Amphitheater or the Gallien Palace, which dates from the 1st century AD.

Burgundy Gate Address: Place Bir Hakeim.

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